Archive for the ‘Zacchaeus Sunday’ Category

Sunday Of Zacchaeus. He Sought To See Jesus Who He Was.

Sunday, February 6th, 2011

Icon of Zacchaeus and Christ

LISTEN NOW

Synopsis: Jesus will show Himself to every man, without exception. Why is it that some, such as Zacchaeus see Him as He really is, and others such as the crowd who judged Zacchaeus, do not see Him even though He is in their midst? The whole point to life is to "see Jesus", that is, to know Him. Zacchaeus gives us import instructions as to how to accomplish this. Every day, we must be like Zacchaeus, recognizing who we are, and how little we are and how much our sins present an obstacle to knowing God, and run ahead of them to await the Lord coming to us. HE will always come – are we always in the proper state of mind to receive Him?

More text and audio homilies on the the Sunday of Zacchaeus are HERE

Luke 19:1-10 1 And Jesus entered and passed through Jericho. 2 And, behold, there was a man named Zacchaeus, which was the chief among the publicans, and he was rich. 3 And he sought to see Jesus who he was; and could not for the press, because he was little of stature. 4 And he ran before, and climbed up into a sycomore tree to see him: for he was to pass that way. 5 And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up, and saw him, and said unto him, Zacchaeus, make haste, and come down; for to day I must abide at thy house. 6 And he made haste, and came down, and received him joyfully. 7 And when they saw it, they all murmured, saying, That he was gone to be guest with a man that is a sinner. 8 And Zacchaeus stood, and said unto the Lord: Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have taken any thing from any man by false accusation, I restore him fourfold. 9 And Jesus said unto him, This day is salvation come to this house, forsomuch as he also is a son of Abraham. 10 For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.


If the "LISTEN NOW" link does not work, copy this URL into your browser: http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2011–02-06+sunday-of-zacchaeus+he-sought-to-see-jesus-who-he-was_luke19-1-10.m3u

If this file does not work for you, try the direct link to the actual mp3 file:http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2011–02-06+sunday-of-zacchaeus+he-sought-to-see-jesus-who-he-was_luke19-1-10.mp3


RSS feed of Sunday and some weekday homiliesRSS feed of Sunday and some weekday homilies:http://feeds.feedburner.com/OrthodoxChristianSermonsOnTheGospelsEpistlesAndOtherTopics

Archive of Audio and text homilies:http://www.orthodox.net/sermons

Share

Zacchaeus Sunday A before and beginning story, to be continued… Text and audio.

Saturday, February 5th, 2011

Zacchaeus Sunday
A “before” and “beginning” story, to be continued…

Hope is very precious. Hope must be kindled. It must be taken care of. Take care of your hope.

Luke 19:1-10

Icons of the Lord Jesus Christ, with Zacchaeus the publican, in the sycamore tree. http://www.orthodox.net/ikons/zaccchaeus-the-publican.jpg I

n the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Today, brothers and sisters, we have a “before” story and a “beginning” story. It is appropriate on this Sunday – only four Sundays remain now after this Sunday before Great Lent. On this day we talk about Zacchaeus, how he was before, at the beginning of the salvation. And it is appropriate because during Great Lent should be, for all of us, a struggle to become more spiritual, to know more about ourselves and about God, to do good works, to pray, to fast.

It’s a struggle that is difficult. We will see next Sunday the prayer of the Publican. In our mind’s eye, we think of Zacchaeus when we think of the Publican and the Pharisee, when he was crying: “Oh, God, be merciful to me a sinner”, because he felt the weight of his sins. This is after Zacchaeus had been received by Christ, and he had entered into the struggle against his passions.  

In the Christian life salvation comes to us by degrees, because salvation is us being changed. We change by degrees. Nobody changes all at once. You might make a decision at a critical moment in your life as Zacchaeus did, but you don’t change all at once. You change with struggle.

Now, what happened to Zacchaeus was one of those moments that happen rarely in a man’s life when he saw himself and when he felt deeply in his soul the desire for God.

When you read the Scriptures, you must read them so that they relate to you. You’re the one reading them. What is it saying to you? What is God trying to tell you?

Of course, to read the Scriptures and understand them, you must understand the content of what they say, the factual dogmatic content, the circumstances in which the things were said, instructions that are given and all the rest. All this is very important. But also, another thing that is so important when you read the Scriptures: There must be some emotional impact in your soul, like Zacchaeus. Zacchaeus was changed in a day or rather, I should say, he had the resolve to change. He made a decision and spent the rest of his life living it.

Zacchaeus had many things that were in the way of him finding Christ. The Scripture mentions three: He was a Publican, there was a big crowd, and he was very little.

As a Publican he had done many sinful things. He was ashamed because he had defrauded people, he hurt people. Are we like publicans? You had better think so because there’s not a human being that shouldn’t feel ashamed for the things he’s done or not done, is willing to do, not willing to do, the way he thinks, the way he doesn’t think. And often these feelings can keep one away from God.

I am convinced that the majority of the entertainments and all the things in life that are so frivolous and fruitless are really a way for people to escape from knowing who they really are. You cannot hear God if you’re not quiet; and if you hear God and you’re quiet, you’re going to find out what kind of a person you are, and that’s not a pretty picture.

Zacchaeus had all of that going on in his life. He was a very bad man. He was the chief of the publicans. He had done a lot of bad and terrible things, and he had that on his conscience, but he had heard of Christ. After all, he was a Jew even if he was a bad one. He knew of Christ, and wanted to see Him because there was this thing in his heart that was wondering: “How can I get out of this morass that I am in? I want to change, I don’t know how.”

So what was he going to do? He wanted to be better. He didn’t know how. Any of you ever feel like that? I feel like that every day. Now, I know in principle how: Through the blood of Christ, through God’s mercy, through my struggle. As far as how to get from A to B in exact detail, I don’t understand that because my sins are too big for me. They’re too big for you too.

So Zacchaeus wants to see Christ but the press is in the way, the crowd. So many things get in our way, so many busy things, so many concerns that we have that we really shouldn’t be very concerned about. Most of the press is ourselves. Most of the crowd is our own lifestyle getting in the way of being good.

But he had the crowd to deal with, he was short, and could not see. So what did he do? He went up high. He went up in a tree. Now, imagine the scene: A publican hated by everybody, making a spectacle of himself in a tree. Certainly there must have been many comments about him. This is a man accustomed to at least people flattering him in public; they wouldn’t say anything about him to his face. But in a crowd probably there was a lot of snickering and laughter.

And then Christ came and what happened? He looked up, and He saw Zacchaeus, and Zacchaeus was changed because Christ loves transforming. And He said something very interesting. “Make haste. Come down because today I must abide in your house.”

This would have been unheard of and quite a scandal: a holy man going to the house of a sinner. It was not just his house the Lord was talking about: it was his soul. The Lord will abide in our soul. What an amazing thing!

When I read this Scripture, I’m filled with possibilities for me and, since I’m a pastor, always about you too. God can change us if we are willing, but we have to be able to overcome all that inertia of sin, all those chains that are holding onto us or sometimes that we hold onto ourselves. And we have to do something. We have to press past the crowd, and we have to get up in the tree, and we have to wait for Christ.

And the thing is, every single time that He comes to the tree, He will look up and tell us to make haste and come down because He will abide within us. Every time. Sometimes this is hard for us to believe. I know this, having been a pastor for many years, I know that we really don’t completely believe it, because we’re pretty bad, and it’s hard for us to really believe that we can really be changed. When you read Scriptures like this it’s important to hold onto that emotion, that fervor, that feeling of being changed that Zacchaeus must have had.

There are many Scriptures like this. I have dozens of favorite Scriptures that touch me in a very intimate way and that I hold onto (and you should too). Most of life, (as I said in a post [1] just recently that I hope you all read carefully), seems to be great spaces filled with short moments. That’s not what it should be for a Christian. It should be one moment of being in Christ. Nothing in our life is mundane. Nothing in our life cannot be changed. Everything can be changed.

But I think we need to feel this fervor and remind ourselves of it. It is very difficult when you are down, when you’re tired, when you’re lazy, when you’re feeling bad thoughts or whatever else is going on — it’s really hard to remember that feeling you had before such as Zacchaeus had when the Lord looked up to him and there was hope for Zacchaeus.

What did he do in his fervor? He made promises to the Lord. He was full of joy, and he made promises that he hadn’t thought of before. And surely he fulfilled them. Absolutely he fulfilled them, but they would be difficult to fulfill., and he would have a lot of habits that he’d have to overcome.

Just getting out of that tree didn’t make him good. Getting out of that tree gave him the ability to become good, gave him hope to become good, gave him a way out. But he was still a person with passions, proclivities towards sin, commitments to people that he couldn’t ignore. He still had a long road to go.

And that’s why I believe that this is right before Great Lent, because Great Lent is a long road. Great Lent should be hard. It should be when you learn something of yourself and you struggle and you do more than you usually do. We have more services during Great Lent. We fast more strictly during Great Lent. And, to be perfectly frank with you, if you do those things — I guess if you don’t do these things, probably this doesn’t happen — but if you do those things you will come to periods of time in Great Lent when you feel a great sense of despair, and you’re not getting much better; you’re pretty much the same person you were two weeks ago, two years ago, twenty years ago, still full of sin, full of bad habits.

Remember when Jairus’ daughter was dying and his servant came up to Him as Christ was going, and he said, don’t trouble the Master; she’s dead? I think we feel that; I know we feel that; I’m positive. I think very few people who struggle do not have those moments.

The way you get through those moments is with struggle and with holding things close to your breast from the Scriptures and the services. It’s not so much that we must have particular things memorized, although that’s a very good thing to do; I recommend it highly. But the feeling of reading the Scriptures, the feeling of hopefulness that Zacchaeus must have had, that decision: “I am going to be better and now I have a way to be better”; that’s the good news, and this is what you must hold onto. There’s going to be a lot of times when it’s very hard. But if you will hold onto that, then there is still joy in you even in the midst of sadness.

Try it. See if I’m right. During this Lent, fast more strictly than you did before. Go to more services. We have plenty of opportunities. Pray. Read the Scripture more, or even start reading the Scripture. Attempt to give alms and do good works.

And you’ll find, even before the third week, you’re kind of tired, and there will be those voices inside you, those voices of the person that’s the Publican inside you: “You’re not really going to get much better. You really do have a lot of bad habits. What are you doing all this for? You’re just hungry and you’re more irritable than usual.” Don’t listen to those voices.

Listen to that voice inside you that was the person in the tree and you heard the Lord say to you, “Come down because I’ll abide in your house.”

It’s not just a nursery tale. This is the truth. This is absolutely what happens to the Christian soul. God visits it, fills it with hope. You can’t do anything without hope, nothing. Hope is very precious. Hope must be kindled. It must be taken care of. Take care of your hope.

Struggle. But remember that God will receive you just as He received Zacchaeus. Don’t let anything or anybody make you forget this. And He will abide in your house, and you will be saved. Amen.

Transcribed by the hand of Helen

 

Priest Seraphim Holland 2009

 

This and other Orthodox materials are available in from:

St. Nicholas Orthodox Church, McKinney, Texas

 

·         Mailing Address: Box 37, McKinney, TX 75070

·         Rectory Phone: 972/529-2754

·         Email: seraphim@orthodox.net

·         Web Page: http://www.orthodox.net

·         Redeeming the Time Blog: http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime/

 

This homily is at:

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2009-02-01+sunday-of-zacchaeus.html

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2009-02-01+sunday-of-zacchaeus.doc

Audio: http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2009-02-01+sunday-of-zacchaeus.mp3

http://www/.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime

Archive of commentaries: http://www.orthodox.net/scripture

Archive of homilies: http://www.orthodox.net/sermons

 

To receive regular mailings of sermons, and scriptural and services commentary and other things throughout the church year, read our blog “Redeeming the Time” (http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime). You may also subscribe to the RSS Feed or receive its postings by email.

 

Our parish Email list ( http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church) also has all the latest postings from our website and blog; everyone is welcome to join.

 

All rights reserved.  Please use this material in any edifying reason. We ask that you contact St. Nicholas if you wish to distribute it in any way.  We grant permission to post this text, if completely intact only, including this paragraph and the URL of the text, to any electronic mailing list, church bulletin, web page or blog.



[1] The article begin referred to is:

“Everything MUST have meaning! Sickness.  Drug Addiction. Priorities”, writtenSept 26/ Oct 8 2009.

http://orthodox.net/redeemingthetime/2009/10/09/everything-must-have-meaning-sickness-drug-addiction-priorities/

 

http://www.orthodox.net/journal/2009-10-09-everything-we-do-must-have-meaning-drug-addiction-sickness-priorities.html

 

http://www.orthodox.net/journal/2009-10-09-everything-we-do-must-have-meaning-drug-addiction-sickness-priorities.doc

 

The conclusion of this article was: There are as many more examples as there are situations in our lives. So much of our life is great, meaningless spaces surrounded by little moments full of meaning. The task of the Christian is to have less space. Our Lord Jesus Christ had absolutely none of this “space” Everything He did, thought or said had meaning. This is our goal.  Let’s improve a little, but by bit, until we have reached it.”

 

Share

Sunday of Zacchaeus Homilies

Thursday, February 3rd, 2011
Share

Homily:Sunday of Zacchaeus. Push past the press!

Friday, January 15th, 2010



Zacchaeus the publican. zaccchaeus-the-publican.jpg In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen. [1]

Brothers and sisters, today is Zacchaeus Sunday; it one of the five Sundays that precedes Great Lent and helps us prepare for the Great Fast. 

 

Zacchaeus was a publican and very rich.  This meant that he was very corrupt because the way publicans became rich was by extorting more money than the Romans actually taxed.  They were Jews, but they extorted their own people for their own personal gain. 

 

Zacchaeus had heard about Christ; everybody had heard about Christ.  He was the “happening” thing at that time and He was an event wherever He went.  People came out of curiosity, as well because they believed or wanted to be healed. 

 

As Christ is coming into town, passing through Jericho, Zacchaeus hears about His arrival.  And something in Zacchaeus’ soul, although he probably didn’t even understand it at that time, desired to see Christ.  Perhaps he had some hope he could change and amend his life, even though he had been so far away from God for so long because he had been so corrupt; hurt so many; lied, stolen.  Probably he contributed to people’s death by extorting money from poor widows and such.  But he wanted to see Christ, but he was small, short, and the crowd was large and he wouldn’t be able to see Christ.  So, being a clever man, he ran ahead and climbed into a tree so he could see Christ. 

 

Now what do we understand from this?  The Scripture is a historical record, but it is also a mystical teaching.  This historical event teaches spiritual truths, and teaches us how to live.  Now, I have also told you that you should read the Scriptures to see how they apply to you, both the good and the bad.  When you see a sinner in the Scriptures, beg the Lord to forgive you of your sins.  When you see someone righteous, confessing in the Scriptures, beg the Lord that you would have the strength to do the same.  When you see Zacchaeus, beg the Lord that you would be freed of any avarice, any grabbing on to money, any greed, any dishonesty, any lack of compassion … all these things that Zacchaeus had in abundance, like shall we say, a legion of sins [2]

 

Also, when you see Zacchaeus, notice how he climbed up into a tree.  Even though he was hindered from seeing Christ, he didn’t give up.  The press is the crowd of people who were keeping him from seeing because he was short.  I ask you look at the spiritual meaning of what the press is — it is our sins, our passions, our worldly concerns, our false priorities.  And also the press is our shame.  It is important to understand this.  Many of us understand about our sins and desire not to sin anymore, but this press of shame often keeps us from seeing God because what God wants you to do when you sin is to run to Him, and the “press” is a formidable obstacle between us and the arms of our Father.

 

Our Lord uses the image of a child to teach us what our disposition should be after we sin.  A child who has been in a normal family with parents that love him when he sins and his parents scold him or spank him, what does he do?  He cries big tears and then he hugs his parent and says, “I’m sorry” immediately.  This is how we should be when we sin so we can see Christ again because sin makes our eyes grow dim.  We are not able to see Christ when we sin. 

 

We should be like Zacchaeus; when we sin we should push pass the press.  And the press indeed is often our own shame; our own incredulity about our sins.  Why are you surprised when you sin?  I have said this to some of you in confession, probably almost everybody.  Why be surprised when you sin?  Why be offended when you sin?  Your sinning shouldn’t offend you.  Your sinning offends God.  When you sin, push past that pride that the devil puts in your way and struggle to repent of that sin so that you will restore full communion with God in your soul. 

 

Brothers and sisters, the press is just not entanglements in the world.  We create our own press.  The press could be depression; this press could be despondency; this press could be our shame.  Or it could be other sins: laziness, wrong priorities, anything that keeps us from Christ …all these things are the press. 

 

You must find a way around the press.  If you do not have the strength to push past it, then find a way to be over it like Zacchaeus was.  And how did he find his way to be able to see Christ?  By rising up, by going into the tree.  Always, the only way that we can accomplish anything is by having our eyes on Christ, by thinking of things above and not earthly.  So if there is something that you cannot conquer, something that grieves you, something that saddens you, then you must climb the tree, you must make the effort to pray and as part of your praying to be struggling to follow the Commandments. 

 

Now Zacchaeus didn’t know these things.  All he wanted to do was see Christ.  Now Christ saw that there was a good heart buried under all that corruption in Zacchaeus.  So when He passed by him, He said, “Zacchaeus make haste and come down, for today I must abide at thine house.” 

 

Now this occurs with us, too, brothers and sisters.  When our Lord sees that we have pushed past the press, even if it is only a small amount, even if we are still in the middle of the crowd, but struggling to get out, even if we haven’t made it to the tree, much less been able to climb it with exalted thoughts and prayer, the Lord sees this and says, “Make haste, make haste.  I will abide with you.”  Make haste means: “consider My living inside you, My Grace that I give you to be the most critical and important thing in your entire life.  Run to it!  Order your life according to it!”  Make haste today.  Today salvation comes to our house, and every day because the Kingdom of God is within us. 

 

God is very close, very near brothers and sisters.  And He is constantly telling us, “Make haste!  Come down!  Be with Me.  Learn of Me.  I am meek and lowly.  My yoke is easy.  Learn of Me.  I am sweet; a sweetness that you cannot experience in anything else.  I am joy, a joy which you cannot obtain from anything earthly.  I am incorruptible and I will make you who are corrupted perfect.”  The Lord says this often, brothers and sisters. 

 

Do you hear Him say, “Make haste”?  Do you hear Him say, “Today I will abide in your house”, that is, your soul?  Do you hear this?  A Christian should hear this.  Everyday you should be trying to prepare your house; make it a little bit cleaner.  A little bit more straightened up, so that the Lord would abide in it as an honored guest. 

 

Now Zacchaeus had not repented of any of his sins before the Lord said, “Come down.”, but the Lord knew he would.  The Lord accepts us because of our potential brothers and sisters.   We can become perfected; He knows how to accomplish it.  The only thing He asks of us is that we make haste; the only thing He asks of us is that we make an effort.  That we struggle, that we try, that when obstacles are in our lives, we find ways around them by His grace and with His help and with our effort. 

 

They go and have dinner at Zacchaeus’ house.  Zacchaeus is full of joy because here was a Rabbi, a great teacher, who accepted him.  No one else accepted him because he had defrauded so many people.  And he felt joy.  There must have been such a feeling in his heart at the time of joy and expectation and that maybe he could change now.  Maybe he could put off this burden that had been dragging his conscience down for so many years. 

 

But there are people in the crowd, at the dinner, that are saying that he is a sinner and they are murmuring about it.  The Lord hears this and so does Zacchaeus.  So he pledges to the Lord, “Behold, the half of my goods I give to poor, and if I have taken anything from any man by false accusation, I restore him four-fold.”  If you work out the math, basically Zacchaeus has just impoverished himself.  A person who has been accustomed to silk pillows and the finest of foods and an abundance of wine and probably to wealthy courtesans to give him his every whim and wish, suddenly is going to make himself poor for the sake of Christ.  This is repentance, brothers and sisters, this is contrition. 

 

The Lord requires this of us; requires that we give up what we were so that we can become what we should be.  Jesus waits for Zacchaeus to say this (of course He knew he was going to say it), and when He hears it says, “This day is salvation come to this house.”  Now what is salvation, brothers and sisters?  In the West, salvation is thought of in such a miniscule fashion.  There is such poverty in the minds of people when they consider what salvation is!  Most people think that salvation is that when you die, you go to heaven.  Salvation is, “Well, you have sins and Jesus Christ pays the penalty of your sins and you go to heaven.” 

 

May it never be that we have such a small view! Salvation is restoration, brothers and sisters.  Salvation is completion.  Salvation is being made perfect.  Salvation is being able to cast off everything that hurts, everything that is heavy, and to be able to see Christ as He is, to be able to know the true nature of things.  Salvation is when a soul changes.  And Zacchaeus was changing. 

 

Brothers and sisters, do you hear the Lord telling you to make haste?  Do you hear the Lord saying salvation has come to your house?  Do you hear the Lord telling you about His sweetness?  About his perfection? About His love for you?  Do you hear these things?  Perhaps you don’t hear these things.  You should hear them everyday.  If you don’t hear, this is because you have sins that are holding you down. 

 

Push past the press, brothers and sisters.  The whole world is going to go away.  It is going to be recreated.  Everything will be made new.  Will you be new?  If you have not become new, if you have not changed, then you will be like that old piece of cloth…it can’t be put on a new wineskin [3].  Brothers and sisters, be like Zacchaeus.  Press past the crowd; find a way to see Christ.  And when Christ speaks to you, make haste and come down and do everything in your power so that He may abide in your house and never leave.  May God help you in all things.  Amen.



[1] This homily was preached at St Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, Dallas, Texas, on Zacchaeus Sunday, 2002

[2] Cf. Mark 5:9, Luke 8:30

[3] [Mat 9:17]  Neither do men put new wine into old bottles: else the bottles break, and the wine runneth out, and the bottles perish: but they put new wine into new bottles, and both are preserved.

 

Share

Zacchaeus Sunday 2009. A “before” and “begining” story, to be continued…

Sunday, February 1st, 2009

LISTEN NOW

Lots more about the Sunday of Zacchaeus:

 

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_1999+sunday-of-zacchaeus_1tim;4-9-15+luke19;1-10.doc
1st Sunday before Great Lent (Word DOC format)
Sunday Of Zacchaeus
1 Tim:4-9-15, Luke 19:1-10
1999

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2001+sunday-of-zacchaeus.html
1st Sunday before Great Lent (HTML format)
Sunday Of Zacchaeus
2001

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2002+zacchaeus-sunday.doc
1st Sunday before Great Lent (Word DOC format)
Zacchaeus Sunday
2002

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2007-01-21+sunday-of-zaccheaus.mp3
1st Sunday before Great Lent (mp3 format)
Sunday Of Zaccheaus
2007

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2008-02-10+sunday-of-zaccheaus+encouragement.mp3
1st Sunday before Great Lent (mp3 format)
Sunday Of Zaccheaus
Encouragement
2008

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2009-02-01+sunday-of-zacchaeus.mp3
1st Sunday before Great Lent (mp3 format)
Sunday Of Zacchaeus
A "before" and "begining" story, to be continued…
Luke 19:1-10
2009

 

Luke 19:1-10 1 And Jesus entered and passed through Jericho. 2 And, behold, there was a man named Zacchaeus, which was the chief among the publicans, and he was rich. 3 And he sought to see Jesus who he was; and could not for the press, because he was little of stature. 4 And he ran before, and climbed up into a sycomore tree to see him: for he was to pass that way. 5 And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up, and saw him, and said unto him, Zacchaeus, make haste, and come down; for to day I must abide at thy house. 6 And he made haste, and came down, and received him joyfully. 7 And when they saw it, they all murmured, saying, That he was gone to be guest with a man that is a sinner. 8 And Zacchaeus stood, and said unto the Lord: Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have taken any thing from any man by false accusation, I restore him fourfold. 9 And Jesus said unto him, This day is salvation come to this house, forsomuch as he also is a son of Abraham. 10 For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.



If the "LISTEN NOW" link does not work, copy this URL into your browser: http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2009-02-01+sunday-of-zacchaeus.m3u

If this file does not work for you, try the direct link to the actual mp3 file:http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-01_2009-02-01+sunday-of-zacchaeus.mp3



RSS feed of Sunday and some weekday homiliesRSS feed of Sunday and some weekday homilies:http://feeds.feedburner.com/OrthodoxChristianSermonsOnTheGospelsEpistlesAndOtherTopics

Archive of Audio and text homilies:http://www.orthodox.net/sermons

Share