Archive for November, 2008

22nd Week After Pentecost – MONDAY. Today’s readings, followed by a few pastoral & personal thoughts.

Monday, November 10th, 2008

 









A note to the reader: It is my fervent hope that all readers of these small meditations (among whom, I fervently also hope will be all of my precious flock, who receive  them as they are written), will be inspired to meditate upon the scriptures often, reading them daily. I hope that these explanations will help you along your way to deeper understanding of the scriptures, which contain the words of life. The study of the scriptures can be frustrating, because they are a deep well, and often every word has a deep meaning. We cannot understand what we are not ready for, but we will never understand if we do not try! Please, struggle in your Christian life – prayer, fasting, the struggle to follow the commandments, and the reading of the Scriptures and other edifying writings. God will enlighten you and help you if you are consistent, and do everything with effort.

 

Colossians 2:13-20  And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses; 14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross; 15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it. 16 Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days: 17 Which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ. 18 Let no man beguile you of your reward in a voluntary humility and worshipping of angels, intruding into those things which he hath not seen, vainly puffed up by his fleshly mind, 19 And not holding the Head, from which all the body by joints and bands having nourishment ministered, and knit together, increaseth with the increase of God. 20 Wherefore if ye be dead with Christ from the rudiments of the world, why, as though living in the world, are ye subject to ordinances,

 

Luke 9:18-22  And it came to pass, as he was alone praying, his disciples were with him: and he asked them, saying, Whom say the people that I am? 19 They answering said, John the Baptist; but some say, Elias; and others say, that one of the old prophets is risen again. 20 He said unto them, But whom say ye that I am? Peter answering said, The Christ of God. 21 And he straitly charged them, and commanded them to tell no man that thing; 22 Saying, The Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be slain, and be raised the third day.

 

 

Colossians 2:13-20  And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;

 

The “flesh” referred to here is not our body. The word “flesh” not only refers to our bodies, bur also to our whole person, our human nature, body and soul. St Paul goes to great lengths to teach his Gentile brethren that physical circumcision is not necessary. It was a “type” or foreshadowing of baptism, and when the actual is present, the type is not needed. “For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision, but a new creature.” (Gal 6:15, see also Gal 2:3-5).

 

Although the Jews were very proud of circumcision as the physical sign that they were the chosen people, it was always intended to refer to an inner, spiritual change in a person:

 

“Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiffnecked. (Deu 10:16)

 

“And the LORD thy God will circumcise thine heart, and the heart of thy seed, to love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, that thou mayest live.” (Deu 30:6)

 

“For he is not a Jew, which is one outwardly; neither is that circumcision, which is outward in the flesh:” (Rom 2:28)

 

Although circumcision and baptism both refer to a spiritual change, only baptism enables a man to accomplish this change. The Apostle has already just taught this:

 

“Buried with him in baptism, wherein also ye are risen with him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead.” (Col 2:12)

 

and reiterates the point here, when he tells the Colossians that they had been “you, being dead in their sins”, (to which he adds, “and the uncircumcision of your flesh”, which always must be the case for the sinner – his flesh (human nature) has not been completely purified), were “quickened together with him”, that is, enabled to become righteous by Jesus Christ.

 

 

Colossians 2:14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;

 

The “handwriting of ordinances” is the law, and our transgression of it. The Jews could not fulfil the law, but we can, because of Jesus Christ.

 

Colossians 2:15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.

 

The Apostle here mentions two of the nine known ranks of Angels. Of course, the angels here mentioned are demons. There are ranks of good and bad angels, among whom are “principalities and powers”. The know angelic ranks are Cherubim, Seraphim, Thrones, Dominions, Powers, Authorities, Principalities, Archangels and Angels.

 

Colossians 2:18 Let no man beguile you of your reward in a voluntary humility and worshipping of angels, intruding into those things which he hath not seen, vainly puffed up by his fleshly mind, 19 And not holding the Head, from which all the body by joints and bands having nourishment ministered, and knit together, increaseth with the increase of God.

 

The Apostle is addressing a heresy, described by St John Chrysostom: “There are some who maintain that we must be brought near by Angels, not by Christ, that were too great a thing for us(Homily VI, on Colossians ii. 6, 7, http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf113.iv.iv.vi.html)

 

The sectarians of our age use verses like this to falsely label asking for the intercession of angels and saints as idolatrous. We only worship God, and God has sent forth His angels to help us. We each have a guardian angel which was mentioned by Christ: “Take heed that ye despise not one of these little ones; for I say unto you, That in heaven their angels do always behold the face of my Father which is in heaven.” (Mat 18:10)  Since scripture is replete with examples of the help of angels, and we each have a guardian angel, it makes no sense whatsoever that we would be unable to, or forbidden to ask for their help.

 

Sectarians truly get the scripture wrong, over and over, because they do not read it with the mind of Christ, which is only in the church.

 

Dear reader, you may gain this mind by cleaving to the church, with fasting and prayer, and effort. Wisdom will come to you if you struggle. Without struggle in spirit and truth, all the sayings of the scripture are closed to the mind of man.

 

 

Bibliography

 

 

St John Chrysostom, Homily VI, on Colossians ii. 6, 7, http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf113.iv.iv.vi.html

 

The Explanation of the Holy Gospel according to St Luke, by Blessed Theophylact, published by Chrysostom Press – http://www.chrysostompress.org/. ALL FOUR BOOKS ARE HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

 

 

Priest Seraphim Oct 28/Nov 10  2008.                                                                                            St Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, McKinney, Texas

http://www.orthodox.net/scripture/22nd-week-after-pentecost_monday_colossians2;13-20+luke9;18-22.rtf

http://www.orthodox.net/scripture/22nd-week-after-pentecost_monday_colossians2;13-20+luke9;18-22.pdf

 

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21st Sun after Pentecost 2008. The Parable of the Sower.

Sunday, November 9th, 2008

“We can only be good ground if we are crucified with Christ.”




LISTEN NOW

Galatians 2:16-20 Knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law, but by the faith of Jesus Christ, even we have believed in Jesus Christ, that we might be justified by the faith of Christ, and not by the works of the law: for by the works of the law shall no flesh be justified. 17 But if, while we seek to be justified by Christ, we ourselves also are found sinners, is therefore Christ the minister of sin? God forbid. 18 For if I build again the things which I destroyed, I make myself a transgressor. 19 For I through the law am dead to the law, that I might live unto God. 20 I am crucified with Christ: neverthless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.

Luke 8:5-15  A sower went out to sow his seed: and as he sowed, some fell by the way side; and it was trodden down, and the fowls of the air devoured it. 6 And some fell upon a rock; and as soon as it was sprung up, it withered away, because it lacked moisture. 7 And some fell among thorns; and the thorns sprang up with it, and choked it. 8 And other fell on good ground, and sprang up, and bare fruit an hundredfold. And when he had said these things, he cried, He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. 9 And his disciples asked him, saying, What might this parable be? 10 And he said, Unto you it is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom of God: but to others in parables; that seeing they might not see, and hearing they might not understand. 11 Now the parable is this: The seed is the word of God. 12 Those by the way side are they that hear; then cometh the devil, and taketh away the word out of their hearts, lest they should believe and be saved. 13 They on the rock are they, which, when they hear, receive the word with joy; and these have no root, which for a while believe, and in time of temptation fall away. 14 And that which fell among thorns are they, which, when they have heard, go forth, and are choked with cares and riches and pleasures of this life, and bring no fruit to perfection. 15 But that on the good ground are they, which in an honest and good heart, having heard the word, keep it, and bring forth fruit with patience.



If the “LISTEN NOW” link does not work, copy this URL into your browser: http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_2008-11-09.m3u

If this file does not work for you, try the direct link to the actual mp3 file:http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_2008-11-09.mp3

 

Other Homilies for this day: 

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_1997.html
21st Sunday after Pentecost (HTML format)
1997

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_1999+the-sower.pdf
21st Sunday after Pentecost (Adobe PDF format)
The Sower
1999
Also in Format: http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_2002+the-parable-of-the-sower.mp3
21st Sunday after Pentecost (mp3 format)
The Parable Of The Sower
2002

http:/www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_2003.mp3/www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_2003.mp3
21st Sunday after Pentecost (mp3 format)

2003

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_2004.mp3
21st Sunday after Pentecost (mp3 format)
2004

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_2008-11-09.mp3
21st Sunday after Pentecost (mp3 format)
The Parable of the Sower
We can only be good ground if we are crucified with Christ.
Galatians 2:16-20 Luke 8:5-15
2008
 

 


 

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21st Sunday after Pentecost, Luke 8:5-15, The Sower

Saturday, November 8th, 2008

This year, the 21st Sunday after Pentecost is on Oct 27/Nov 9 2008.

 

 



Luke 8:5-15
 A sower went out to sow his seed: and as he sowed, some fell by the way side; and it was trodden down, and the fowls of the air devoured it. {6} And some fell upon a rock; and as soon as it was sprung up, it withered away, because it lacked moisture. {7} And some fell among thorns; and the thorns sprang up with it, and choked it. {8} And other fell on good ground, and sprang up, and bare fruit an hundredfold. And when he had said these things, he cried, He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. {9} And his disciples asked him, saying, What might this parable be? {10} And he said, Unto you it is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom of God: but to others in parables; that seeing they might not see, and hearing they might not understand. {11} Now the parable is this: The seed is the word of God. {12} Those by the way side are they that hear; then cometh the devil, and taketh away the word out of their hearts, lest they should believe and be saved. {13} They on the rock are they, which, when they hear, receive the word with joy; and these have no root, which for a while believe, and in time of temptation fall away. {14} And that which fell among thorns are they, which, when they have heard, go forth, and are choked with cares and riches and pleasures of this life, and bring no fruit to perfection. {15} But that on the good ground are they, which in an honest and good heart, having heard the word, keep it, and bring forth fruit with patience.



 
In the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit, amen. Today is the Twenty First Sunday after Pentecost[1], and it is also the day that we remember the Holy Fathers of the Seventh Ecumenical Council. This council established permanently what the church had always known concerning the holy icons.
Today, we read the parable of the Sower, which is a very familiar parable, known even to people that are not Christians. So many of these parables are really part and parcel of our culture. People even use biblical terminology and don’t even know that they are using it. 
 
How do these parables affect us? There is an inner meaning and an outer meaning to these parables. Why did our Lord speak in parables? He certainly said quite a few of them , didn’t He? Why did he say things with a hidden meaning? The Fathers explain to us that when you look into something deeply and carefully, when it takes effort to look into it, then you develop more of an understanding. If something is handed to you and there is no effort involved in learning it, then you develop very little understanding.
 
We can see this principle even in secular life. Look at how young people can barely even read and write now, because of this television age that we are in. Information is given to them so freely it takes very little effort to find it out.
 
Also the parables are given because God does not those who are not worthy to be told things that they will be judged for. A man must do some investigation if he is to learn the deep meaning of these things, and God will judge us for what we know. God will also judge us for what we don’t know, if we CHOOSE to not know things. God will judge us the same if we know something and don’t do it or we choose to be ignorant in the ways of piety. If we are willfully ignorant, and this occurs whenever we do not try to seek out the knowledge of God’s commandments and exercise them in our life, God will then judge us in the Judgment, even if we try to say we do not know something.
 
 
What is the inner and outer meaning of this parable? There is a lot of explanation given for this parable, even in the very text of scripture itself. It is very rare in scripture where our Lord actually explains the deeper meaning of some dark saying of His. The Apostles came to Him, and they must have also come to Him many other times, and they said, we don’t understand this at all. He explained this to them, because it’s meaning is so important.
 
“A sower went out to sow his seed”. Who is the sower? None other than the Lord Jesus Christ. Be careful when you read scripture — every word has meaning. The Sower went OUT to sow his seed”. He did not go “out” from the farmhouse and start to work — this “going out” is the incarnation of the Son of God. The seed is the word of God, those words that He spoke.
 
As he sowed, some seed fell by various places, the wayside, the rock, among the thorns and on good ground. It “fell”. It was not thrown. It fell everywhere equally, and these places, are the souls of men. The preexisting one, Jesus Christ, thought it not robbery to be equal to us, and became a man. And He sowed his teaching to the entire universe, equally and freely to all men. It is available to everyone.
 
There are four kinds of men described in this parable, and, three of those kinds perished. Three out of the four kinds of men will perish. The majority will perish. This is true in our age, and has been true in every age. The majority of people will not inherit the Kingdom of God, because they are not the good ground. And yet our Lord and Savior still sows His seed, and still gives the opportunity to a man to accept Him and to follow His commandments.
 
Remember the story of the talents? The man with the one talent — our Lord knew that He was not going to use this talent. Remember what a talent is? It is the grace of God, which enables us to do good works, to do His commandments, and to learn more of Him. The man with the one talent is like the ground by the wayside. The fowls of the air  immediately snatch away the word from his heart, and he never really believes at all. I am sure we have known people like that, who really have no belief whatsoever. The wayside is hard, and packed down. No seed can penetrate into it, and it is washed away, or it sits there, prey for the birds of the air. The birds are the demons, which snatch away the word from a man’s heart, but only because a man leaves it out there, unprotected, and does not cherish it. The demons cannot take away the word from your heart if you hold it close to yourself, only if you care nothing for it.
 
So these men by the wayside, they have no part in salvation whatsoever, they never even bothered to believe. Some of the seed fell upon the rock, and when it was spring up, it withered away, because it lacked moisture. Have you every been to a glade? This is an area where there is a thin layer of soil over limestone bluffs, and only certain kinds of plants can grow. When there is a drought, everything dies, except for a few very hardy trees. There is a little bit of soil, a very small amount, but there is not enough soil to retain any moisture, which is the essence of Christ. There is just a small amount of knowledge, and not much struggle or desire, and at the merest, smallest trial, such a person falls away, and he perishes.
 
Some people are thorny ground. The thorns spring up with the good wheat, the word of God. These thorns choke out the following of the commandments. They choke out the knowledge of God, because we turn away from God, to our thorns, whatever they are, whether they be riches, cares of this world, sensual pleasures, our pride, our fear, ambition. There are hundreds of ways that a man can turn away from Christ, even though he appears to be a Christian.
 
Remember the parable about the wheat and the tares? These tares are the same as thorns. The tares are growing up right by the wheat, and except to a man who has extreme discretion and knowledge, and of course, the God-man, Jesus Christ, such people are sometimes indistinguishable to true Christians. They go to church, they have families, they may give alms, and they do everything externally just like everybody else, except they don’t have any life within them. Where their treasure is, so their heart is, and their treasure is not Christ, so Christ is not with them. Those people who are amidst the thorns have not Christ, even though they would call themselves Christians. 
 
Some of the seed, a small amount of the seed, by the way, fell on good ground. And it sprang up and bear fruit. St. Luke says a hundred fold, and St. Matthew also recounts this story and shows that the Lord gave other information. Some sprang up thirty, some sixty, and some a hundred fold, because not all the Saints are the same. Not everyone follows the word of God to the same degree, or the same amount. I guess that is good news to me, because I don’t at this moment think that I can become like the Saints. I shouldn’t think this way, because God can change a man, if he only gives himself to Him. However, if none of us lives with the LOFTY righteousness of the Saints, God has a place for us in His mansion, since there are many rooms, if we make an effort to live according to His commandments.
 
I have said this many times before; success is not as important as your effort. If you make an effort, then in the end, paradoxically, you will be successful, because God will receive your repentance, and reward you, for some thirty, some sixty, some one hundred. May it be that we all receive a hundred fold. May we all be like the man who had five talents, and labored and increased it to ten, and then our Lord gave him an infinite amount of grace.
 
Now, how is it that we can be good ground? Isn’t that really what we should try to learn from this parable? What is good ground? Good ground has been tilled carefully, and dug, and the clods of dirt have been broken up, and it has been finely sifted, and fertilizer has been added to it, and it has been watered, and hedged round about so that animals can not get in. It has been guarded, so not one can steal the fruits it will produce.   There is effort involved in having good ground. It does not just “happen”.  
 
Last year, I tilled a part of my property in order to plant. I did not take care of it this year, and did not plant, and you can not even TELL that it was good ground, and it was VERY good ground after I had finished with it, but I didn’t take care of it, and so, it reverted back. The same thing will happen to us. If we do not take care of the seed that is planted within us, we will revert back to the type of man we previously were, and we will allow the tares to grow in us. They will choke us out. Even if there are not tares to begin with – the seeds of tares fly through the air, don’t they? So do the demons. The tares can come into good ground at any time, and they constantly must be plucked out and uprooted with great care. It is very painful to tear out many tares by the way, especially thorns and thistles, because they are sharp and they cut, and make us bleed. Regardless, we must do this work, and tear out these thorns and thistles if we are to be good ground, if indeed, we have EVEN begun to be good ground!
 
Our Savior says about those on the good ground, “But that on the good ground are they, which in an honest and good heart, having heard the word, keep it, and bring forth fruit with patience.”. There are those words, that we have trouble with ( I have trouble with them sometimes); “Having heard the word, KEEP it and bring forth fruit with PATIENCE.” Patience is the most difficult word in our language. the Christian life is patience, endurance. He who endures to the end will be saved. We are just beginning you know. And if indeed there is some part of our soul that is good ground, let us make the rest of it good ground, by careful labor, by backbreaking labor. And, while we are cleaning out those parts of our souls, let us at the same time pay attention to the places we have cleared, so the tares do not come in, and choke us.
 
How are we to do this? This is a task beyond our abilities! The Apostle tells us, in a marvelous way. He says, “For I through the law am dead to the law, that I might live unto God. I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.”[2] Marvelous, magnificent words! May they be true in our lives. May we say that we no longer live, but Christ lives in us. May we live by faith, since this is the only way to accomplish our task. And what is our task? It is to know Christ isn’t it? Isn’t that what it said in the other gospel today?[3] Our Savior was praying to His Heavenly father, shortly before He was going to go to His great passion for our salvation, and He said, “And this is life eternal, that they might know Thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent.”[4] 
 
What is knowledge? Knowledge is intimacy. Knowledge is … love. To know God is to love Him, and give everything to Him. We see evidence of this kind of love even in our own relationships. The love of a husband for a wife, or a child for his mother or father, and especially the love of an infant, such perfect love. But just like a child who is not so intimate with his parents after he has done something wrong – he doesn’t show up in the same room for a while, he doesn’t want to talk to them, he hangs his head, he has broken communion with them because of guilt — so it is with us, if we do not follow the Lord’s commandments. Then, we will not be able to cry “Abba, Father”, because we will be hanging our head in shame. Or worse, I say most people don’t do that, because they cannot bear that kind of shame. Instead, they just leave God. They become choked with cares, or lusts or passions, with misplaced priorities, or they become even worse than that, and they wither away, and have no faith whatsoever. That’s what happens to most people.
 
I hope that in our church, if you forgive the expression, we beat the “odds”. I hope that all of us will be good ground, but I know that the only way that this can be possibly true is if we struggle – apart and together. We must pray for one-another, help one-another, and then, in our corner, in our closet, cry out to God each day, asking Him to help us with whatever passions we have, with whatever sins we commit. Even if we have poor attitudes, and we desire to change our attitudes.
 
Do you know that all sin, and even all action proceeds from thought? Everything we do proceeds from thought. We decide to do something, and then we do it, whether it is good or bad. So we must amend our thoughts. That is why the Apostle Paul says, “Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.”[5] Train yourself! So now, if you want to be good ground, you must not add any trash to this ground. You must not add such things as impure thoughts, gossip, judging others. You can surely think of many other things that are within your heart that you do and that are affecting your ground. And if ground is left alone, and just walked over, and not cared for, it becomes the wayside. It becomes hard and the seed can no longer penetrate, and that which is in it dies, or never germinates. So we have a great labor to do, my brothers and sisters. We must continue to care for our ground carefully. And we must have patience.
 
There are two sides to patience. One is that we must be patient with our position in life, with our status, with the amount of money we make, with the difficulties we are encountering. We must not curse God or say that we should have this or we should have that. This is one kind of patience.
 
There is another kind – a very important kind of patience. Allow God to work! It takes time for Him to work. We do not know how much time we have, but the time we have is what God has allotted to us. He is going to use every moment of that time to perfect us. So, if we have trouble with our sins, if there is something that we fall into every day, then EVERY day repent of it, and be patient! Be manly in spirit, and do not be like a child and run away from that sin, or rather, run away from the knowledge of that sin, since it will always be with you until you conquer it. Confront it! Confront it with sword and with shield, and with buckler, and with faith.[6] Eventually, God will deliver you. It will happen. It is guaranteed. If a man struggles to know to know God’s commandments, He will reveal them. This is absolutely certain, because in your struggling, you will be doing His commandments.
 
So, be patient, and cultivate your ground every day, every moment. However, be careful not to judge yourself. This is a hard lesson, that takes us a long time to learn – to not judge ourselves, and look at the sins we are doing and to say we can never do better. Well, in some things we do better, and in some things, God help us and forgive us, we have done worse, but the demons cannot take away from us that we are children of the Most High. We are able to cry “Abba Father”, only if we are struggling to live in Christ. God lives within us. He enlightens us, He helps us, even though we are sinners. So, if He has come to us and has offered us FREELY His grace and mercy, who are we, in our pride and arrogance to say “that is not enough mercy or enough grace. I can’t change”? Every man can change. Everyone can change magnificently if he only allows God to change him, but this takes time, a lot of time. I am sure, you are like me, and are very tired of your sins. They weigh us down, they are like an anchor, and they cut and they hurt. And yet, in some weird and perverted way, they are dear to us. They must be dear to us in some way, but God understands, and will help us if we make an effort, and if we are patient.
 
None of us right now are the wayside because we are at least trying to be Christians. Some of us may be the rock, some may be thorns. God knows, and this will be all revealed in the end. Even if you have very little soil right now, and even if you are choked with thorns and cares, God will help you to become good soil. He will help any man to become good soil. He is no respecter of persons. Any man that desires will be given, freely, God’s mercy. So take God’s mercy and clasp it to your hearts. Hold in to it and cultivate it, and be good soil, and God will save you.
 
Amen.



 
http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_1999+the-sower.doc
http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-21_1999+the-sower.rtf
 
This, and other Orthodox materials are available in booklet and electronic form from:
 
St. Nicholas Orthodox Church, Dallas, Texas
Mailing Address
2102 Summit, McKinney TX 75070
Rectory Phone
972/529-2754
Email
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[1] This homily was transcribed from one given On Oct 14, 1996 according to the church calendar, being the Twenty First Sunday after Pentecost,. and the day appointed for the commemoration of the Holy Fathers of the Seventh Ecumenical Council. There are some stylistic changes and minor corrections made and several footnotes have been added, but otherwise, it is essentially in a colloquial, “spoken” style. It is hoped that something in these words will help and edify the reader, but a sermon read from a page cannot enlighten a soul as much as attendance and reverent worship at the Vigil service, which prepares the soul for the Holy Liturgy, and the hearing of the scriptures and the preaching of them in the context of the Holy Divine Liturgy. In such circumstances the soul is enlightened much more than when words are read on a page.
[2] Galations 2:19-20
[3] John 17:1-13, read for the Sunday of the Fathers of the Seventh Ecumenical Council, and other times during the year
[4] John 17:3
[5] Philippians 4:8
[6] Cf. Ephesians 6:13-17

 

 

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21st Week After Pentecost – Saturday

Saturday, November 8th, 2008

 








Today’s readings, followed by a few pastoral & personal thoughts.

 2 Corinthians 3:12-18 Seeing then that we have such hope, we use great plainness of speech: 13 And not as Moses, which put a veil over his face, that the children of Israel could not stedfastly look to the end of that which is abolished: 14 But their minds were blinded: for until this day remaineth the same veil untaken away in the reading of the old testament; which veil is done away in Christ. 15 But even unto this day, when Moses is read, the veil is upon their heart. 16 Nevertheless when it shall turn to the Lord, the veil shall be taken away. 17 Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. 18 But we all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord.

 

Luke 6:1-10 And it came to pass on the second sabbath after the first, that he went through the corn fields; and his disciples plucked the ears of corn, and did eat, rubbing them in their hands. 2 And certain of the Pharisees said unto them, Why do ye that which is not lawful to do on the sabbath days? 3 And Jesus answering them said, Have ye not read so much as this, what David did, when himself was an hungred, and they which were with him; 4 How he went into the house of God, and did take and eat the shewbread, and gave also to them that were with him; which it is not lawful to eat but for the priests alone? 5 And he said unto them, That the Son of man is Lord also of the sabbath. 6 And it came to pass also on another sabbath, that he entered into the synagogue and taught: and there was a man whose right hand was withered. 7 And the scribes and Pharisees watched him, whether he would heal on the sabbath day; that they might find an accusation against him. 8 But he knew their thoughts, and said to the man which had the withered hand, Rise up, and stand forth in the midst. And he arose and stood forth. 9 Then said Jesus unto them, I will ask you one thing; Is it lawful on the sabbath days to do good, or to do evil? to save life, or to destroy it? 10 And looking round about upon them all, he said unto the man, Stretch forth thy hand. And he did so: and his hand was restored whole as the other.

 

 

2 Corinthians 3:12-14 Seeing then that we have such hope, we use great plainness of speech: 13 And not as Moses, which put a veil over his face, that the children of Israel could not stedfastly look to the end of that which is abolished: 14 But their minds were blinded: for until this day remaineth the same veil untaken away in the reading of the old testament; which veil is done away in Christ.

 

The Apostle’s plain speech makes it very clear that the OT taught the same principles as the New, but not understood as such because “their minds were blinded”. With the coming of Christ, of whom we read yesterday: “are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Col 2:3), the veil was lifted.

 

One should rightly ask: if the message was the same from Old to New, how did the coming of Christ bring about more understanding? As always, the answer concerns morality. The God-man came to teach us and enable us to become moral. As a man becomes good, the “veil” is progressively lifted from his eyes.

 

2 Corithinans 3:17-18 17 Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. 18 But we all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord

 

This liberty which the Apostle speaks of was promised by the Son: If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed! (John 8:36)  Just before this, our Lord told us that “Whosoever committeth sin is the servant of sin” (John 8:34). The word servant may also be rendered “slave” (it is the Greek word ?????? , “doulos”). The Spirit of the Lord, when He dwells in a man, brings about liberty, that is, the freedom to choose morally and correctly.  

 

This promise is the core of the “Good News”. Through Christ, and with much labor, we will become able to be truly, in every way free.

 

However, this freedom does not come all at once. The Apostle also said: “For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.“  (1 Cor 3:12)

 

 

Luke 6:1-2 And it came to pass on the second sabbath after the first, that he went through the corn fields; and his disciples plucked the ears of corn, and did eat, rubbing them in their hands. 2 And certain of the Pharisees said unto them, Why do ye that which is not lawful to do on the sabbath days?

 

The day being described is Saturday, which was always a Sabbath day in the Jewish calendar. It is the “second after the first”, because “Sabbath” also means rest, and was a generic term for any Feast day. If a feast fell on a Friday, Saturday would therefore be the “second sabbath after the first”.

The Pharisees were complaining because work was forbidden on the Sabbath, and they interpreted the disciples gleaning of grain as “work”.

 

Luke 6:3-4  3 And Jesus answering them said, Have ye not read so much as this, what David did, when himself was an hungred, and they which were with him; 4 How he went into the house of God, and did take and eat the shewbread, and gave also to them that were with him; which it is not lawful to eat but for the priests alone?

 

The “shewbread” was bread made of the finest flour, and placed on the holy table in the temple:

“And thou shalt take fine flour, and bake twelve cakes thereof: two tenth deals shall be in one cake.  (6)  And thou shalt set them in two rows, six on a row, upon the pure table before the LORD.” (Lev 24:5-6)

 

This bread was renewed every Sabbath, and the old bread was eaten by the priests only. (Lev 24:5-9).

 

The incident our Lord refers to is this:

 

“Now therefore what is under thine hand? give me five loaves of bread in mine hand, or what there is present.  (4)  And the priest answered David, and said, There is no common bread under mine hand, but there is hallowed bread; if the young men have kept themselves at least from women.  (5)  And David answered the priest, and said unto him, Of a truth women have been kept from us about these three days, since I came out, and the vessels of the young men are holy, and the bread is in a manner common, yea, though it were sanctified this day in the vessel.  (6)  So the priest gave him hallowed bread: for there was no bread there but the shewbread, that was taken from before the LORD, to put hot bread in the day when it was taken away.” (1Sa 21:3-6)

 

Of course, as bread on an altar, the showbread was a type of Christ, and pointed to the Eucharist.

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

The Explanation of the Holy Gospel according to St Luke, by Blessed Theophylact, published by Chrysostom Press – http://www.chrysostompress.org/. ALL FOUR BOOKS ARE HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

 

 

Priest Seraphim Oct 26/Nov 8 2008.                                                                                              St Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, McKinney, Texas

http://www.orthodox.net/scripture/21st-week-after-pentecost_saturday_corinthians3;12-18+luke6;1-10.rtf

http://www.orthodox.net/scripture/21st-week-after-pentecost_saturday_corinthians3;12-18+luke6;1-10.pdf

 

New commentaries are posted on our BLOG: http://www/.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime

Archive of: commentaries: http://www.orthodox.net/scripture 

Archive of homilies: http://www.orthodox.net/sermons

 

Use this for any edifying reason, but please give credit, and include the URL were the text was found. We would love to hear from you with comments!

 

 

 

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21st Week After Pentecost – Friday. “being knit together in love”

Friday, November 7th, 2008
Today’s readings, followed by a few small pastoral and personal thoughts.
 
Colossians 2:1-7 For I would that ye knew what great conflict I have for you, and for them at Laodicea, and for as many as have not seen my face in the flesh; 2 That their hearts might be comforted, being knit together in love, and unto all riches of the full assurance of understanding, to the acknowledgement of the mystery of God, and of the Father, and of Christ; 3 In whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. 4 And this I say, lest any man should beguile you with enticing words. 5 For though I be absent in the flesh, yet am I with you in the spirit, joying and beholding your order, and the stedfastness of your faith in Christ. 6 As ye have therefore received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk ye in him: 7 Rooted and built up in him, and stablished in the faith, as ye have been taught, abounding therein with thanksgiving.
 
The reading for The Feast of the Circumcision follows. This is not part of today’s selection and is skipped in the regular readings after Pentecost (see notes below), but included here, because it is so good. 
 
Col 2:8-12 Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ. 9 For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily. 10 And ye are complete in him, which is the head of all principality and power: 11 In whom also ye are circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, in putting off the body of the sins of the flesh by the circumcision of Christ: 12 Buried with him in baptism, wherein also ye are risen with him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead.
 
 
Luke 9:12-18 And when the day began to wear away, then came the twelve, and said unto him, Send the multitude away, that they may go into the towns and country round about, and lodge, and get victuals: for we are here in a desert place. 13 But he said unto them, Give ye them to eat. And they said, We have no more but five loaves and two fishes; except we should go and buy meat for all this people. 14 For they were about five thousand men. And he said to his disciples, Make them sit down by fifties in a company. 15 And they did so, and made them all sit down. 16 Then he took the five loaves and the two fishes, and looking up to heaven, he blessed them, and brake, and gave to the disciples to set before the multitude. 17 And they did eat, and were all filled: and there was taken up of fragments that remained to them twelve baskets. 18 And it came to pass, as he was alone praying, his disciples were with him: and he asked them, saying, Whom say the people that I am?
 
 

General Notes on Gospel and Epistle Readings:

 
The daily readings are arranged in such a way that as much as possible of the Gospels, Acts and Epistles (not including Revelation) are read throughout the entire church year, with as little repetition as possible
 
Today, we are continuing Colossians in order from beginning to end, and one would think that the next entry to be read after this one would be Colossians 2:8-12, however this section is omitted, since it is read at another time in the church year (on the feast of the Circumcision, Jan 1/14). Any time a selection is reserved for another time in the church year (such as all Saturdays and Sundays throughout the year, or various feast of the Lord, Theotokos, or saints), that selection is skipped in the weekly readings.
 
 
The weekend (Saturday and Sunday) has different readings from the Epistles and Gospels that do not follow the order of the weekday readings. Perhaps this is because the most instructive readings are reserved for this time. For example, even though during the weekdays of the 21st week after Pentecost, we are reading selections from Colossians, on the 21st Saturday we read from 2 Corinthians 3:12-18, and then on the 21st Sunday, from Galatians 2:16-20
 
Have you ever wondered when a week starts? The LAST day of the week is Sunday. Monday starts a new week. After this Sunday, the 21st after Pentecost, we begin the 22nd week after Pentecost.
 
 
 

General Notes on the Gospel

 

 

This is the only miracle recorded by all four evangelists (Mat 14:15-21, Mark 6:44-34, Luke 8:12-18, John 6:5-13). All of these versions involve five loaves and two fish.
 
The Evangelist Mark also records another miracle, involving seven loaves, and “few small fishes” (Mark 8:2-9)
 
This miracle is remembered whenever we celebrate “Litia”, in which five loaves, wheat, wine and oil are blessed. This service occurs on certain feast days in between Vespers and Matins at the All Night Vigil service. The Old believers celebrate Litia at all Saturday night vigils.
 
 
 

Colossians 2:1-2For I would that ye knew what great conflict I have for you, and for them at Laodicea, and for as many as have not seen my face in the flesh; 2 That their hearts might be comforted, being knit together in love, and unto all riches of the full assurance of understanding, to the acknowledgement of the mystery of God, and of the Father, and of Christ;

 
Such a beautiful turn of phrase: “being knit together in love”! How close this knitting must bring the faithful to one another!
 
When the soldiers were dividing the garments of Christ, they cast lots for His coat, because it was one piece “woven from the top throughout” (John 19:24). This coat represents the seamless body of Christ, the church, which is one, and not divided into parts. If we actually live according to this prayer of the Apostle, our being knit together to each other emulates the body of Christ. All things all held together, energized, and understood by love.
 
Note here how “being knit together in love” leads us “all riches of the full assurance of understanding”. In other words, we can know NOTHING without love.
 
It would be good for us to consider what “type” of love the Apostle speaks of. “Love” has become a cheap word today. Each thread in a seamless garment is equal. None is more important than the other, since if a thread is damaged, eventually neighboring threads will become damaged, and the entire garment will fall into disarray. What a high calling it is to consider everyone to be equal to ourselves! To live in such a way that we are “knit together in love” is to perfectly fulfill the “Golden Rule”[1] and to perfectly obey the Greatest Commandment, and the second commandment which is like it[2].
 
 

Colossians 2:6 As ye have therefore received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk ye in him:

 
This admonition is very similar to the hymn “As many have been baptized into Christ, have put on Christ, Alleluia”, taken from Galatians: “For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ.(Gal 3:27 ) Thishymn is sung at all baptisms, on Theophany and at other times.
 
To receive Christ is to be baptized into Him, and if we “put Him on” we shall surely walk in Him. This means, plainly, that we are to emulate Christ, and live as He lived. The Christian life is to acquire this way of living by degrees.
 
Everything is about morality. We were baptized in order to become perfectly moral (the bible calls such a one “pure in heart”[3]).  In receiving Christ, we obtained the ability to become moral. If we dare to call ourselves Christian, we must therefore change our way of living in everything, so that we walk in Christ. The only way to know “mystery of God, and of the Father, and of Christ”, is to walk in Christ. We will then learn by experience “all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge”, which are hidden in Christ (Cf. Colossians 2:2-3)
 
Bibliography
 
Sermons of St John Chrysosom on Colossians. (http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf113.html). These are accessible to almost anyone. They are a bit difficult to read, but well worth it. I will post a link to the Russian text when given it.
 
The Explanation of the Holy Gospel according to St Luke, by Blessed Theophylact, published by Chrysostom Press – http://www.chrysostompress.org/. ALL FOUR BOOKS ARE HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
 
 
    Priest Seraphim Oct 25/Nov 7 2008.                                        
 St Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, McKinney, Texas
http://www.orthodox.net/scripture/21st-week-after-pentecost_friday_colossians2;1-7+luke9;12-18.rtf
http://www.orthodox.net/scripture/21st-week-after-pentecost_friday_colossians2;1-7+luke9;12-18.pdf
New commentaries are posted on our BLOG: http://www/.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime
Archive of: commentaries: http://www.orthodox.net/scripture homilies: http://www.orthodox.net/sermons
Use this for any edifying reason, but please give credit, and include the URL were the text was found. We would love to hear from you with comments!
 
 
 


[1]Luke 6: 31 “And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise”
[2] Mat 22:36-39 “Master, which is the great commandment in the law? (37) Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. (38) This is the first and great commandment. (39) And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.”
[3] Mat 5:8 Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God
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21st Week After Pentecost – Tuesday. JUST PRAY!

Tuesday, November 4th, 2008








Today’s readings, followed by a few small pastoral and personal thoughts.

Colossians 1:1-2, 7-11 Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ by the will of God, and Timotheus our brother, 2 To the saints and faithful brethren in Christ which are at Colosse: Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. 7 As ye also learned of Epaphras our dear fellowservant, who is for you a faithful minister of Christ; 8 Who also declared unto us your love in the Spirit. 9 For this cause we also, since the day we heard it, do not cease to pray for you, and to desire that ye might be filled with the knowledge of his will in all wisdom and spiritual understanding; 10 That ye might walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God; 11 Strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness;

 

Luke 8:1-3 And it came to pass afterward, that he went throughout every city and village, preaching and shewing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God: and the twelve were with him, 2 And certain women, which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary called Magdalene, out of whom went seven devils, 3 And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod’s steward, and Susanna, and many others, which ministered unto him of their substance.

 

Colossians1:9-11 For this cause we also, since the day we heard it, do not cease to pray for you, and to desire that ye might be filled with the knowledge of his will in all wisdom and spiritual understanding; 10 That ye might walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God; 11 Strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness;

 

The Apostle provides us with a “template” for how to pray for others. See how vehemently he prays for others! When I read this passage, I am convicted about how little I pray for others, and how weak my prayers are compared to the Apostle.

 

Things are definitely better now that I have some time to breathe and am not either working at night, sleeping, feeling like a “zombie”, or at church. I have a regular prayer rule in which I pray for everyone in my flock, by name, every day. I want my prayer to be as warm and intense as the Apostle, and also as often, but at this point in time, I am what I am. So, I pray, knowing that I should be better, and also knowing that if I pray, I will become better (at prayer, and everything else in the spiritual life).

 

There are few of us who can pray with the depth of emotion, empathy and longing for the well-being of others that the Apostle possesses, but we must pray. A Christian principle is that if we try, with God’s help, we will become better (I believe that this principle is so important that I have said something like this maybe a zillion times in my homilies). So, let us as least pray for others.

 

I have recommended to many personally to make a small list of loved ones and to pray for everyone on that list everyday (I will send my dyptichs, which have all the parish member’s names, to those who ask). I should be on that list, because I am your unworthy pastor, and I need the grace of God to guide my flock wisely.

 

We should begin by merely saying the Jesus prayer for each person, i.e.

 

“Lord Jesus Christ son of God, have mercy upon the Priest Seraphim”

 

If this is too much for us, then all we need say is:

 

 “Lord have mercy upon the Priest Seraphim”.

 

This is the beginning for us. If we are faithful in prayer for others, God will guide us to deeper, more earnest and heartfelt prayer, like the Apostle’s.

 

I have meant for a long time to write a little essay that I have considered entitling “The hardest thing I did today”, or something like it. It would be about prayer. The hardest thing I do each day is pray for others. There are a multitude of distractions that attempt to keep me from this task. And then when I am praying, there is this “voice” that is whispering to me “Why bother the master?” (Mark 5:35). God will hear the “effective prayer of a righteous man” (James 5:16), and I am not righteous. How can I expect God to hear my prayer? My state of mind is distracted, and wooden, and how can I expect God to hear me in such a state?

 

These are powerful emotions, and they are from the pit of Hell. It is true that my prayer can be distracted and wooden, but I know that if I try to pray, I will learn to pray! I also know that my intent is good, even if my performance is flawed. God sees into our heart, and knows our intent, and helps us. If am firmly convinced that the most important time of the day is when I pray for others, and no matter how “well” I did, it is the best thing that I do every day.

 

I urge you to pray for others every day. Do not listen to the thoughts that tell you that your efforts are wasted. Just pray.


 

Priest Seraphim Oct 19/Nov 3 2008.                                              St Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, McKinney, Texas

http://www.orthodox.net/scripture/21st-week-after-pentecost_tuesday_colossians1;1-2,7-11+luke8;1-3.rtf

http://www.orthodox.net/scripture/21st-week-after-pentecost_tuesday_colossians1;1-2,7-11+luke8;1-3.pdf

New commentaries are posted on our BLOG: http://www/.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime

Archive of: commentaries: http://www.orthodox.net/scripture  homilies: http://www.orthodox.net/sermons

Use this for any edifying reason, but please give credit , and include the URL were the text was found. We would love to hear from you with comments!

 

 

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“Not because I desire a gift: but I desire fruit that may abound to your account.” Phil 4:17

Monday, November 3rd, 2008

 






21st Week After Pentecost – Monday

This is every pastor’s prayer and fervent desire for everyone in his flock. Although St Paul is talking about alms-giving that helped him personally, this sentiment equally applies to almsgiving to the church as a whole – tithes, pledges, ordinary regular giving, and extraordinary giving for specific needs.



The subject of MONEY is one of the most difficult for a pastor to discuss with his flock, individually and collectively. There are always those who become offended because it is “talked about too much”, or “all they want from me is my money”. The actual truth of the matter is that a pastor knows, that, since where a person’s treasure is, so is their heart, if a Christian does not give to God freely, easily, and with joy, he will make no progress in the spiritual life. The actual amount is not important; there is not a set amount everyone should give. This depends on a person’s financial and spiritual status. The only necessity is that giving be done with liberality and joy, with the expectation in so doing, fruit would be born in the soul.


If only everyone in the flock would understand the burden the pastor bears for the well-being of his flock! This burden is so evident to every pastor when he reads these words of the Holy Apostle Paul, a pastor’s pastor. Everything the pastor talks about and asks for is for the benefit of the flock. The giving of money is the sort of thing that ALWAYS returns to the giver – not in terms of increased material wealth (the heretics on TV often teach this), but ALWAYS building up one’s treasure in heaven. Almsgiving is a pillar upon which the Christian faith rests, and this pillar is formed out of love, obedience and desire to do the commandments..


 One MUST pray, and fast and give alms in order to be saved (note, this is not a comprehensive list!). If one does it poorly, then at least the attempt is made! We can always improve, but only if we try. All of these three things should be discussed in intimate detail with the pastor. A good amount of prayer of fasting or almsgiving for one is too much or too little for another. The only absolute is that we must struggle in all three.


 I must mention that there are criminal pastors who ask for money for sinful reasons. They will have their reward. May God judge them, and root them out of the flock. They are a scandal and an abomination, however, if a person gives in good faith, they always receive their reward. We must practice good stewardship. If we find out that there is dishonesty or wanton waste in church finances, we should give alms where we are more sure they can be used wisely, however, we must give alms!


 Philippians 4:10-23  But I rejoiced in the Lord greatly, that now at the last your care of me hath flourished again; wherein ye were also careful, but ye lacked opportunity. 11 Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content. 12 I know both how to be abased, and I know how to abound: every where and in all things I am instructed both to be full and to be hungry, both to abound and to suffer need. 13 I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me. 14 Notwithstanding ye have well done, that ye did communicate with my affliction. 15 Now ye Philippians know also, that in the beginning of the gospel, when I departed from Macedonia, no church communicated with me as concerning giving and receiving, but ye only. 16 For even in Thessalonica ye sent once and again unto my necessity. 17 Not because I desire a gift: but I desire fruit that may abound to your account. 18 But I have all, and abound: I am full, having received of Epaphroditus the things which were sent from you, an odour of a sweet smell, a sacrifice acceptable, wellpleasing to God. 19 But my God shall supply all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus. 20 Now unto God and our Father be glory for ever and ever. Amen. 21 Salute every saint in Christ Jesus. The brethren which are with me greet you. 22 All the saints salute you, chiefly they that are of Caesar’s household. 23 The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all. Amen.

 

Priest Seraphim Oct 21/Nov 3 2008.                                              St Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, McKinney, Texas

http://www.orthodox.net/scripture/21st-week-after-pentecost_monday_ philippians4;10-23+Luke7;36-50.rtf

http://www.orthodox.net/scripture/21st-week-after-pentecost_monday_ philippians4;10-23+Luke7;36-50.pdf

 

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20th Sunday, 2008. The raising of the son of the widow of Nain. We cannot understand this story unless we weep.

Sunday, November 2nd, 2008

LISTEN NOW

Luke 7:11-16 And it came to pass the day after, that he went into a city called Nain; and many of his disciples went with him, and much people. 12 Now when he came nigh to the gate of the city, behold, there was a dead man carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow: and much people of the city was with her. 13 And when the Lord saw her, he had compassion on her, and said unto her, Weep not. 14 And he came and touched the bier: and they that bare him stood still. And he said, Young man, I say unto thee, Arise. 15 And he that was dead sat up, and began to speak. And he delivered him to his mother. 16 And there came a fear on all: and they glorified God, saying, That a great prophet is risen up among us; and, That God hath visited his people.



If the "LISTEN NOW" link does not work, copy this URL into your browser: http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-20_2008-11-02.m3u

If this file does not work for you, try the direct link to the actual mp3 file:http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-20_2008-11-02.mp3



Other Homilies on this Sunday:

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-20_1997.html
20th Sunday of Pentecost (HTML format)
1997

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-20_1998+the-resurrection-of-the-son-of-the-widow-of-nain.doc
20th Sunday of Pentecost (Word DOC format)
The Resurrection Of The Son Of The Widow Of Nain
1998

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-20_2002.rtf
20th Sunday of Pentecost (RTF format)
2002

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-20_2002+the-resurrection-of-the-son-of-the-widow-of-nain.mp3
20th Sunday of Pentecost (mp3 format)
The Resurrection Of The Son Of The Widow Of Nain
2002

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-20_2004.mp3
20th Sunday of Pentecost (mp3 format)
2004

http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/pentecost-sunday-20_2008-11-02.mp3
20th Sunday of Pentecost (mp3 format)
The raising of the son of the widow of Nain.
We cannot understand this story unless we weep.
Luke 7:11-16
2008

 

 

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