Important Dates in the History of the Russian Church Abroad

1919, May18–24 — The Southern Church Council took place in Stavropol at which the Higher Church Administration was formed in Southern Russia.

1920, November — The evacuation of the White Army from the Crimea took place.

1920, November 19 — the first session of the Higher Church Administration outside the borders of Russia took place.

1920, Nov. 7/20 — the Holy Synod of the Russian Church under the presidency of Patriarch Tikhon ratified the Directive no. 362, concerning the independent governing of dioceses which found themselves out of contact with the Synod and Patriarch, on the basis of which the Russian Church Abroad was founded.

1920, Dec. 2 — the Locum Tenens of the Patriarchal Throne in Constantinople, Metropolitan Dorotheos, gave the blessing for the Higher Church Administration to continue its work under the leadership of Metropolitan Anthony (Khrapovitsky).

1921 — By the invitation of Patriarch Varnava of Serbia the Higher Church Administration moved to Serbia.

1921, July 9/26 — The first session of the Higher Church Administration took place in Sremsky Carlovtsy.

1921, Autumn — The resolution refusing Autocephaly to the Polish Church was issued by Patriarch Tikhon.

1921, Nov. 13/26 — The General Church Council approved the canonical document, "The Statutes Regulating the Government of the Higher Church Administration Abroad."

1921, Nov.17/30 — The "Regulations for the Government of the Russian Dioceses Abroad" was ratified by the General Church Council.

1921, Nov. 21/Dec. 2 — The first General Council of the Russian Church Abroad took place in Sremsky Carlovtsy.

1921 — The General Church Council issued the following documents:"An Epistle of the General Council of the Church Abroad to the Peace Conference at Genoa" with the request to help free Russia from the Bolsheviks; "An Epistle to All the Rulers and Peoples of the World who Believe in God" with the request to aid starving Russia.

1921 — The Finnish diocese was forcefully taken from the Russian Church by the Finnish Church authorities who wanted to join the Church of Constantinople.

1922, March 3/16 — Patriarch Tikhon officially thanked Patriarch Dimitry of Serbia for providing asylum for the Russian Hierarchs.

1922, March 11/24 — A new Diocesan Cathedra was established in Harbin which was headed by Metropolitan Methodius.

1922, May 5 — Patriarch Tikhon was forced by the Soviet Government to issue Directive no. 348, disbanding the Higher Church Administration Abroad.

1922, June 15 — The Higher Church Administration sent an appeal to the heads of the non-Orthodox churches, and the governors and governments of the world to come to the defense of Patriarch Tikhon who was arrested in Moscow.

1922, Aug. 23/Sept. 5 — The Higher Church Administration Abroad recognized Metropolitan Agafangel as the Locum Tenens of Patriarch Tikhon.

1922, Sept. 13 — The Council of Bishops Abroad resolved: in accordance with the directive of Patriarch Tikhon to abolish the Higher Church Administration to create the Synod of Bishops of the Russian Church Abroad. The Council issued an epistle concerning Spiritism, Magnetism, Theosophy, and other occult practices.

1923, April 2–4 — The Detroit Council of Bishops of the North American Diocese illegally proclaimed autocephaly for the "American Orthodox Church" headed by Metropolitan Platon.

1923, May 22/June 4 — The Council of Bishops rejected the Gregorian Calendar (New Style) and other ecclesiastical innovations.

1923 — Archimandrite (later archbishop) Vitaly (Maximenko) founded the monastery of St. Job of Pochaev at Ladomirovo in Carpatho-Russia.

1924, July 30/Aug. 12 — The Synod of Bishops of the Russian Church Abroad issued a directive "To establish prayer for the salvation of the Russian nation and the calming of peoples' passions."

1925, Feb. 15/28 — Metropolitan Anthony (Khrapovitsky) addressed all the rulers and governments of the world and the League of Nations concerning the persecution of the Church in Russia.

1923, July 24/Aug. 6 — At the session of the Synod of Bishops a commission was established concerning the question of union of the Anglican Church with Orthodoxy.

1925, Nov. 12 — The Synod of Bishops of the Russian Church Abroad recognized Metropolitan Peter of Krutitsa as the Locum Tenens of the patriarchal throne.

1926, Jan. 3/16 — The Council of Bishops published a protest concerning the arrest of Metropolitan Peter of Krutitsa.

1926, June 29 — Metropolitan Evlogy of Western Europe and Metropolitan Platon of North America left the Council of Bishops of the Russian Church Abroad.

1926 — Nearly 30 old-calendarist monks, exiled from Valaam by the new-calendarists, came to Serbia on the invitation of the Russian Church Abroad.

1926 — A monastery was established in Milkovo, Serbia, by the Russian exiled monks under the abbot, sche-archimandrite Ambrose (Kurganov).

1927, May 6 — Theological courses were established in Harbin.

1927, July 16/29 — The Declaration of Metropolitan Sergius was published, among other points, demanding loyalty to the Soviet Government from the bishops abroad.

1927, Sept. 9 — The Council of Bishops of the Russian Church Abroad announced its loyalty to the Locum Tenens Metropolitan Peter and its refusal to accept the Declaration of Metropolitan Sergius.

1927, Sept. 6/19 — The Council of Bishops sent an epistle to the North American flock suspending Metropolitan Platon and his clergy from serving for causing a schism.

1928, May 29 — Metropolitan Sergius declared the Council of Bishops and the Synod of the Russian Church Abroad to be abolished.

1928 — The first issue of "Orthodox Carpatho-Russia" was published in Carpatho-Russia at the St. Job of Pochaev press at Ladomirovo.

1928 — Hieromonk Panteleimon procured a piece of land in Jordanville on which later was founded Holy Trinity Monastery.

1929, Sept. 2/25 — The epistle, "To the Orthodox Population of the Far East" was published by Metropolitan Anthony in which he summoned them to war against the enemies of the Church.

1929, Dec. 18/31 — The Council of Bishops issued an epistle calling for the establishment of St. Vladimir's day as a major Russian church-national feast.

1930 — In the Spring after Pascha, with the blessing of Archbishop Apollinary, Hieromonk Panteleimon and monk Iakov founded Holy Trinity Monastery.

1930 — Protopresbyter Father Constantine Izrastsov built the first Orthodox Church in Brazil.

1932, Aug. 28/ Sept. 10 — The Council of Bishops of the Russian Church Abroad anathematized Freemasonry.

1934 — The diocese in Brazil was established and Bishop Theodosius arrived there.

1934, June 22 — Metropolitan Sergius (Stragorodsky) suspended the clergy of the Russian Church Abroad from serving.

1934, Oct. 13/26 — The Council of Bishops consented to the establishment of a world-wide Christian front in the struggle with atheism and Communism.

1935, Oct. 28 — A Chinese Orthodox Christian Brotherhood was founded in Shanghai.

1935, Nov. 15 — At a joint session under the chairmanship of the Serbian Patriarch Varnava at Sremsky Carlovtsy, Metropolitans Anastassy, fulfilling the duties as first hierarch of the Church Abroad, Evlogy and Platon, who returned from schism all signed the "Temporary Regulations of the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad."

1935, Nov. 17 — The Council of Bishops of the Russian Church Abroad condemned the heretical teaching of Archpriest Sergius Bulgakov concerning Sophia, the Wisdom of God.

1936, Jan. 20/Feb. 2 — The cornerstone for the memorial church to the Czar Martyr Nicholas was laid in Brussels.

1936, Feb. — Metropolitan Evlogy and the flock subservient to him perminantly broke away from the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad.

1936, June 28/July 10 — Blessed Metropolitan Anthony (Khrapovitsky) reposed in the Lord.

1936 — Metropolitan Anastassy (Gribanovsky) was elected as the first hierarch of the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad.

1937 — Missionary courses were offered in Belgrade to fight against atheism.

1937 — An Orthodox theological school was opened in the building of the Synod of Bishops.

1937, Oct. 5–8 — The General Church Council of laymen and clergy in America declared itself to be part of the Russian Church Abroad.

1938, Aug. — The Second General Council of the Russian Church Abroad took place in Sremsky Carlovtsy.

1940, Sept. 10/23 — The Council of Bishops confirmed the, "Statutes for the Pastoral-theological courses of the Brotherhood of St. Job of Pochaev at Ladomirovo."

1942 — The convent of the Vladimir icon of the Mother of God, which was begun in the Urals and later located in China, was established in San Francisco.

1943, Oct. 3/16 — The Council of Bishops issued a statement not recognizing the patriarchate of Metropolitan Sergius.

1945 — Metropolitan Anastassy left Munich with the Kursk Icon and arrived in Geneva.

1945, Oct. — The epistle of Metropolitan Anastassy, the First Hierarch of the Russian Church Abroad, was published in answer to the appeal of Patriarch Alexis I of the Moscow Patriarchate.

1946, April 23/May 6 — The Council of Bishops accepted into the Russian Church Abroad hierarchs from the Ukrainian and Belorussian Churches.

1946, April 26/May 9 — The Council of Bishops did not accept the election of Alexis I and rejected his "Epistle to the Clergy and Laity of the 'Carlovtsy Orientation' ."

1946, Nov. — At the Cleveland Council the American Metropolia again broke away from the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad.

1946 — The Australian diocese was established.

1946, Dec. 1 — The Brotherhood of St. Job of Pochaev from Ladomirovo, comprising 14 members, arrived at Holy Trinity Monastery where they united with the brotherhood of the monastery.,

1946 — 1964 — During these years the immigration from Harbin to Australia took place.

1947 — The journal "Orthodox Russia," formerly "Orthodox Carpatho-Russia" was first published at Holy Trinity Monastery.

1948, Oct. 1/14 — The opening of Holy Trinity Seminary at Jordanville N,Y, was established.

1950, Jan. 16/29 — The church at the New Kursk-root Hermitage at Mahopak was consecrated.

1950, Sept. 18/Oct. 1 — The memorial church to the Czar Martyr Nicholas II was consecrated in Brussels.

1950, Nov. — Metropolitan Anastassy and the Synod of Bishops moved to America.

1950, Nov. 13/26 — The cathedral at Holy Trinity Monastery at Jordanville was consecrated.

1950, Nov. 29/Dec. 12 — The "Normal Parish By-laws" were ratified by the Council of Bishops.

1950, Dec. — The Lesna convent moved from Serbia to France. The convent was founded by St. John of Kronstadt and after the revolution moved to Serbia.

1950 — The printshop of St. Job of Pochaev in San Paulo published the first issue of "The Orthodox Observer." Later this journal would be published in Canada.

1950 — A large group of immigrants arrived in San Francisco from Shanghai China

1951, Jan. 23/Feb. 5 — The Kursk Icon of the Mother of God arrived in America.

1952, Aug. 24/Sept. 6 — The Orthodox cemetery at Novo-Diveyevo was consecrated in Spring Valley New York.

1955, Jan. 27/Feb. 9 — The Synod ratified the "Regulations for the St. Vladimir's Russian Orthodox Youth Groups."

1956, Oct. 2/15 — The Council of Bishops ratified the, "Statutes of the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad."

1956 — The journal "Church Word" was first published by the Australian-New Zealand diocese.

1956 — The New Shamordino Convent was founded in Kentlyn Australia.

1957, July 4/17 — Metropolitan Anastassy's epistle on repentance was published.

1958 Jan. 20/Feb. 2 — The first Orthodox church in Peru was consecrated by Archbishop Leonty at Lima.

1958, Sept. 13–15 — In connection with the visit of Khruschev to America molebens were served in all the churches for the salvation of Russian and pannykhidas were served for all those slain and tortured by the godless ones.

1959, Oct. 12 — The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Sign in New York City was consecrated.

1959, Oct. 30/Nov. 12 — The Council of Bishops ratified the "Statutes for Monasteries of the Russian Church Abroad."

1960 — The first Russian Orthodox Youth Conference took place in Chicago.

1964, May 14/27 — Bishop Philaret was chosen as Metropolitan.

1964 — The construction of the Cathedral of the Mother of God, the Joy of All Who Sorrow, was completed in San Francisco under the active participation of Archbishop John (Maximovitch).

1964, June 4/17 — The Council of Bishops issued an Encyclical to the flock and Christians of the free world about persecution of the faithful in the USSR.

1964, Oct. 19/Nov. 1 — The glorification of St. John of Kronstadt took place.

1965, May 9/22 — Metropolitan Anastassy (Gribanovsky) reposed in the Lord.

1970 — The 50th anniversary of the founding of the Russian Church Abroad was celebrated . The missionary from Valaam, St, Herman of Alaska was glorified.

1971, Sept 1/14 — The following documents were published by the Council of Bishops, "The situation of the "Catacomb Church," and "Refusal to Recognize Patriarch Pimen."

1974., Sept. 12/25 — The third General Council of the Russian Church Abroad began at Holy Trinity Monastery in Jordanville. The Council confirmed all previous decisions. One of the more important decisions of this Council was the lifting of the ban on the "Old Rite."

1977 — Metropolitan Philaret accepted into the Russian Church Abroad a group of catacomb clergy in Russia who were without archpastoral care.

1978, Sept. 11/24 — The glorification of Blessed Xenia took place.

1982, Sept. 20/Aug. 2 — A local glorification took place at the Skete of the Prophet Elias on Mt. Athos, of St. Paisius Velichkovsky.

1982, Sept. 20/ Aug. 2 — The New Martyrs and Confessors of Russia and the Royal Martyrs were glorified.

1982, Nov. 24 — The miracle of the Myrrh-streaming Iveron Icon was manifested in Montreal, Canada.

1982 — According to the decision of the Synod of the Russian Church Abroad a secret consecration of Bishop Lazarus took place in Moscow so he might care for the catacomb flock in Russia.

1982 — The 100th anniversary of the Russian Imperial Orthodox Palestine Society was celebrated.

1983 — The Council of Bishops anathematized Ecumenism.

1985, Nov. 8/21 — Metropolitan Philaret (Voznesensky) reposed .

1986 — Archbishop Vitaly of Canada was chosen as the first hierarch of the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad.

1988, Aug. 2–9 — A council of Bishops was called and universal celebrations occurred to honor the 1000th anniversary of the Baptism of Russia,

1990, May 10 — The Optina Elders and St. Paisius Velichkovsky were glorified.

1990, May 2/15 — The Council of Bishops ratified the "Statutes for the Parishes of the Free Russian Orthodox Church" located in Russia.

1990, May 3/16 — The Council of Bishops confirmed the hierarchy in Russia.

1990, July 14/27 — The Synod of Bishops did not recognize the election of Patriarch Alexis II of the Moscow Patriarchate.

1992, Nov. 25/Dec. 8 — The Synod entered into communion with the Old Calendarist Church of Rumania.

1992 — The Russian monks were evicted from the Skete of the Prophet Elias for refusing to commemorate the New Calendar Patriarch of Constantinople.

1994, Jan. 16/29 — St. Innocent of Moscow and St. Nicholas of Japan were glorified.

1994, June 19/July 2 — St. John the Wonderworker of Shanghai and San Francisco was glorified.

1994, July 2/15 — The Synod entered into communion with the Old Calendarists Synod of Metropolitan Cyprian and with the Bulgarian Old Calendarist.

1994, July 16–17 — The celebration of the 200th anniversary of Orthodoxy in America took place in Mayfield Pennsylvania.

1994 — A mission of the Church Abroad was established in South Korea.

1995 — Universal celebrations took place in honor of the 700th anniversary of the finding of the Kursk-root icon of the Mother of God, the Directress of the Russian diaspora.

1996, Oct. 7/20 — St. Jonah of Hankau who struggled and reposed in 1925 in Manchuria, was glorified. After his repose he was glorified by manifest miracles.





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